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I hope you’ve had fun these last two weeks playing with VSCO! It’s one of my favorite apps for editing photos on my iPhone. This week, we are switching gears a little bit. Instead of showing you how I generally edit my photo’s exposure, contrast, etc., like I do on VSCO, this week I’ll show you the “micro-editing” I do on Snapseed.

Snapseed has many of the same features that VSCO does, but I prefer to use VSCO for main editing and Snapseed for the “micro edits”, like small touch ups, getting rid of distracting parts of the photo, or to change a specific part of the photo. Let me show you.

Processed with VSCO with t1 preset

So here is a photo of me with my friend’s horse, Orion. Now, prior to importing the photo into Snapseed, I edited it in VSCO. The photo on the left is post-VSCO processing, but pre-Snapseed processing. See any differences? First, I used Snapseed’s “healing” feature that removes impurities. If you can’t tell, I used this feature to get rid of the white on my sweatshirt and the lead and stains on the floor. This feature took me awhile to get used to, but now that I have it down, it’s great! My advice when you try the healing tool: use small strokes. If you circle a large area, the photo doesn’t get edited well, it just gets messed up. Instead, I repeatedly tap the imperfection that I want to go away.

Next, do you notice any other differences? No, you’re not imagining that my face is brighter and the barn rafters are less yellow in the second photo, I edited it that way. Snapseed also has a cool feature where I can change one aspect of the photo. In this case, I wanted my face to be more exposed, but I didn’t like how yellow the rafters were, so I placed two dots: one near my face and the other near the rafters. In Snapseed, you can only edit one dot at a time though.

Now, let me tell you how these magical dots work. After opening your photo, press “selective”. Then tap where you want the dot to go. In my case, I placed the dot on my face. Once you place it, a white “B” will appear, which is outlined in blue. This means you are adjusting the brightness. You can also edit the contrast and saturation of a certain area as well. In order to change between these three, slide you thumb vertically. The third photo below shows what it should look like when you move your thumbs vertically. Now, once you are on the setting you wish to be on, slide your thumb horizontally. Sliding it to the left will take out whatever the setting you are in. Sliding left will make it darker, have less contrast, or desaturated. Sliding to the right will do the opposite; it will make your photo brighter, more contrasted, or more saturated.

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So, there’s how I use Snapseed! There are other features on Snapseed as well, such as different filters and settings you can play around with, but I prefer to do most of my editing on VSCO. These are the only two photo editing applications I use to edit my photos. However, there is one more app that I use that relates to iPhone photography that I’ll introduce next week! See you then!

These past few weeks have really gone by quickly for me! It’s hard to believe that I’ve shown you all the versatility that the iPhone camera has. Now that you have this newfound knowledge under your belt, it’s time to show you the next step to iPhone photography: editing.

Many photographers would tell you today that upwards of half of being a photographer is editing. I can say with confidence that it takes me much longer to edit and prepare photos for a house or a portrait session than it does to take the photos! While the photo editing software available on iPhone can not rival the workload Photoshop, Bridge, and Lightroom take, these applications are fairly impressive. Let me tell you about one of my favorites: VSCO.

When you open VSCO, the first thing you notice are the symbols at the top and bottom of the screen. There are no words to tell you what these mean, but after a little exploring, I’ve found that I don’t even need them. So first thing’s first, the top left has two sliders. This is how you can change the kinds of photos you can view that you’ve imported to the app. The middle is a “+” which is pretty self-explanatory. This is how you add photos to VSCO. Finally, the third on the top is a way to view a “feed”. VSCO is also a social networking website. It’s kind of like Instagram, but it’s more about photos and editing. I don’t really use VSCO as a social media application, but if you’d like to, feel free to explore on your own!

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Let’s move on the the lower two buttons. The one on the left is for the menu. When you press this, you get your profile, explore, library, shop, and two other smaller icons. Your profile is how you view the photos you’ve published on VSCO. Like I said, I don’t really use this feature, so you’re on your own for that. Then there is explore. This shows you some photos that have been published that you may like on VSCO. Sometimes I like looking at other photos; they give me inspiration for my own! Then there’s library. This is another way to view the photos you’ve imported to VSCO. Next, there’s shop. This is how you can buy more filters. Some of them are pretty fun, so I recommend checking them out! Finally, there are two buttons at the bottom of this screen. The circle on the left is how you can take photos that automatically import into the app. There’s another way to do this too: you press the button on the lower right when on the page where you are looking at your library. The other on the right is how you look at settings within the app.

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Now I’ve shown you around the app. Next week, I’ll actually get into the thick of the app and editing on your iPhone. I don’t want to overload you in one day. See you next week with your unedited photo!

 

 

 

 

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